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Doing nano during the week is the most challenging for me. I work a lot, which means I need to be even more disciplined with my time. Thanks to some work issues, I didn’t even start to think about writing until close to 7PM and I really didn’t think I was going to make it. Also, I had a bad case of the don’t wanna’s. So, I gave myself an hour break and played XBox before I got to writing.

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Not as much writing as I’d like today, mostly my own fault. When I actually sit down to write, I can knock out the words but today I procrastinated and was easily distracted. Still, I managed to hit parity with the Nano model of 1,667 words/day. — Project: Black Mirror New words written: 1,975 Reason for stopping: Midnight — Almost a week in to this draft, I still feel pretty good about it.

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A mostly solid day of writing. Andrea and I went out to the coffee shop for a morning session. I struggled with the words. Came home and napped. Woke and procrastinated until the late evening and then…something broke open. Next thing I knew, I was over 2,000 words and it was almost midnight. I’m not saying they’re great words. Hell, some of them ain’t even good words. They’re my words, though, and I’m keeping them.

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The bad news is I am now fluent in Fluish, having spent a good chunk of the day sleeping away the sickness. When I did bother to wake up and shake off the cobwebs, I grabbed 10 books off the shelf and started making notes. A few favorites, a few classics, a few modern contemporaries, SF and F. I looked at point of view and how each was structured. The results were interesting.

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I haven’t managed to get back to my usual morning schedule of writing yet. Dayjobbery filled most of the day, until I realized that the stack of tissues piling up beside me and the general malaise that I felt was part of a deeper issue. I’m not sure if it’s some weird combination of a head cold, flu, a fibro flare, or accidental glutening but I spent a chunk of the afternoon in bed and the first few hours of the evening just trying to focus.

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Work all day followed by a quick nap and no words before 7:30pm. Andrea kicked me out of the house and I trundled off to the coffee house, was disappointed by the lack of London Fog Tea, and sat to write. When I’m working on a project, it takes me a few days to hit my stride. So far, so good. I did a lot better with suppressing the urge to edit and hey, I made up for yesterdays shortfall.

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I think I’m going to try blogging as I go — nothing extensive because I don’t want to take away from the real writing but I do want to jot down my thoughts. This is a process of learning and experimentation for me. I’ve been writing short stories seriously for four years but writing something novel-length is a different kind of beast. One thing talked about on Twitter today was that some people actually start querying their Nano novels shortly after they’ve finished.

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Today is November 1st, the start of a new NaNoWriMo. I’ve been doing, or trying to do, NaNoWriMo, on and off unsuccessfully since 2002 when my efforts netted about 4,500 words. Timing is a bitch. After I start writing seriously in 2007, I intended to do Nano that year. That November, a few days into the month, my marriage split up. The following November was the official divorce. A few slim years later, it preceded bankruptcy.

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I’ve been running slow on spoons and managing my time carefully, and I neglected to post this sooner. I am extremely delighted to announce the sale of my story, My City of Ruins, to Timid Pirate Publishing, for their anthology Finding Home: Community in Apocalyptic Worlds. Pre-orders will be available on their website November 1st, and the anthology will be released on December 15th, just in time for Christmas. Behold, the Table of Contents:

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I just mailed off my first story submission since 2009. Most of my submissions are electronic but, dating back to my first submissions circa 2007, I think I’ve mailed off 5 or 6 stories or about 5% of my total submissions. Some writers don’t even own printers (John Scalzi comes to mind). Markets are evolving — not quite matching pace, but at least trailing the pack. Analog and Asimov both use the electronic submissions system developed by Neil Clarke.

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